Apple to Samsung – all Devices

As most people know about me, I am very tech savvy. I love Windows, MacOS, Chromium, iOS, Android, BlackBerry (classic and Android)……and the list keeps going on and on.

I recently had an iPhone 7 Plus, an Apple Watch, a 2018 MacBook Pro and an iPad Pro. I was well invested in Apple’s devices simply because I wanted the the ‘experience’ of integrated services.

But all that changed after having three of the worst customer service experiences with the tech giant over a year’s time frame.

My most recent experience was after I bought my shiny new Macbook Pro after hearing the recommendations about this “device for professionals and creatives” from a specialist at my local store. It was a beautiful device – until I tried to run Adobe Creative Suite on it and Microsoft Office. The device began to lag in performance, and for the price tag of $1400, I expected perfection, just like most people would.

So I decided to chat with Apple to see what was going on with my $1400 machine – after all, Apple is supposed to be the best, right? Sure. We’ll let them think that.

…..Anyway…..

The customer support chat was about as responsive as my new lagging $1400 Macbook Pro. After not getting my issues resolved, and after an hour plus of chatting, I informed the chat agent that I appreciated their help and that I was going to return the Macbook Pro.

End of conversation.

So not only did I return my Macbook Pro to the store, I also returned my defective Apple Watch (it was not tracking movement after a recent iOS update), traded in my iPhone 7 Plus at Best Buy and I am also in the process of trading in my iPad Pro as well sometime in the near future.

I went back to my Samsung Galaxy S8 Plus, bought a Samsung Chromebook Pro (with an sPen built in) for $499 on sale and a Samsung 9 Pro Laptop (it has a dedicated graphics card, instant on access, 256 GB SSD just like the Macbook Pro and an sPen built in) $1249 which everything for Adobe Suite and Microsoft Office works just like it should. I have everything synced back to Google Drive (my preferred ecosystem) instead of using Apple’s forced ecosystem (iCloud usage is mandatory to allow sync across devices) and Google’s at the same time.

I am not saying that one platform or device is better than the other, it really is based on personal preference and how one company can pitch a sale better than the other (this should be something for everyone to think about because Apple does a great job of paying the media to keep known issues away from the public for 6 months as they try to resolve the issues behind the scenes and Google is the one that notifies Apple when there is a known issue in security – who is Apple’s primary search engine? Google.) but I never had to contact tech support for a Windows based, Chrome based or Android device that took over 15 minutes to fix (except HP, they take weeks and an FTC complaint). The combination of Android and Windows works best for me.

Am I bitter? Nope. Just logical.

Best Decisions Mobile – Differences between iOS and Android

The differences between Android and iOS (iPhone) has become very minimal. It really is a matter of preference to customize your device more with the Android platform or have Apple applications ready at hand if you use the Apple ecosystem.

I have worked in Tech Support for a major wireless company and being that I’ve used an iPhone (model 3G and up), Windows Mobile, BlackBerry, and numerous Android (4.0 to 8.0) devices (I’m using an HP Chromebook to write this article, but I also own an iPad Pro) – some people call me an expert on all mobile platforms, but to me it’s just the idea of becoming comfortable with what you use in comparison to mobile and PC/MAC/Linux on your home-based devices.

Many people in the United States are more concerned about security more than ever, and they have every right to be. Also, with more people using the iOS (iPhone) platform, I would want to safeguard my device with anti-virus software compared to Android devices. Here’s why:

With Apple, you have one version of their operating system for iPhone, iPads and iPods. If a hacker cracks one, they can crack them all if you’re using an Applie ID. Now Apple has taken rigorous steps in fighting against Malware and Viruses, but since the platform is being used the most in the richest country in the world (the United States) there are more hackers trying to get access to these devices.

Android, on the other hand, has an open source platform. This means that many manufacturers can optimize their own devices, add their own security (on top of Google’s automatic monthly security updates) back up options (on top of Google’s back up), and offer additional storage on certain models.

So does this make Android safer than Apple or vice versa? Yes and no. A hacker would have to breach the manufacturers security and Google’s security to hack an Android device. Being that there are hundreds of different devices out there with the Android platform installed, this can be time consuming for the hacker. However, Android is the most used mobile platform globally, compared to Apple’s iPhone targets here in the United States. But again, most people that use the iPhone is here in the United States and we are the richest country in the world. So it is really up to the user to safeguard themselves on either platform.

I had someone at a luncheon last weekend tell me that I couldn’t afford an iPhone (which of course they owned an iPhone) after looking at my Moto X4. I brushed it off because right after they asked another person at the table what the difference between the iPhone X and the iPhone 10 was……..yeah, I’ll leave it alone. My internal translation wasn’t that I thought they were dumb, it it just felt that they would have a very deep lack of understanding if I tried to explain everything as I just did here.

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Have a great day!